why we need capable leaders, not good orators

ever thought why democracies fail to turn political rhetoric into reality? why phenomenally good speakers who command wide public support hardly deliver even a fraction of what they promise? this is because the ‘by the people’ aspect of democracy gives birth to leaders who possess good oratory skills but lack the requisite competence to govern with efficiency and integrity. india is being self-ruled by representatives chosen by the public since more than seven decades. this is a long time, long enough to eradicate the curses of income inequality, extreme poverty and limited access to education and healthcare. public sector institutions are still riddled with corruption and bureaucracy at all levels lacks both skills and intent to perform their duties in the desired manner. it can be said that the electorate is yet to identify competent leaders out of a market that is inundated with politicians subscribing to different ideologies. voters tend to back politicians who have the best oratory skills.

read more why we need capable leaders, not good orators

why it is impossible to create new jobs in existing industries

one can take cue from the agriculture sector of india, where the demand for farm produce is not commensurate with supply, to understand the jobs generation issue. on the supply side, the number of growers is high and this has resulted in glut in the market for such crops as wheat and sugarcane. by contrast, farmers who have wisely shifted towards alternative options, for example floriculture, are prospering in an otherwise distressed sector. this is enough to understand what needs to be done in manufacturing and services sectors to generate jobs for the large number of youths entering the labourforce. be it the conventional textile industry or telecom, the demand for their products has hit the wall. thus, these industries cannot be expected to generate the jobs needed in the economy. the information technology sector is not in similar distress and new engineers (with updated skills) are being recruited. this is owing to demand for new tech, including cloud, artificial

read more why it is impossible to create new jobs in existing industries

why narendra modi may not go down as a great leader

one needs to revolutionise the prevailing settings in order to be remembered as a great leader. what narendra modi has done or achieved to date isn’t anything extraordinary. he was blessed with oil prices at their historical low, and although such initiatives as mudra and skill india are promising, these are not enough to earn the prime minister the tag of ‘a great reformer’ or to bring the promised socio-economic progress. what lacks is the will to alter the political landscape of india that is inundated with dishonest and prejudiced politicians. to form governments in states, the bjp not only welcomed goons but also has compromised the ideals of good governance. present bjp leaders not only publicly endorse accused and convicted men, they also try to make a hero out of them only to gain electoral support. unless politics of country is rid of vested interests, no reform can sustain in the medium and long run. second, india’s public sector

read more why narendra modi may not go down as a great leader

the ‘underdog theory’ for 2019 lok sabha elections

the election of donald trump as the president of the united states in 2017 was an unexpected outcome of a contest that experts believed was totally tilted toward hillary clinton. allegations ranging from vested business interests to inappropriate conduct with women in the past couldn’t stop the americans to vote for the ‘underdog’, who was simply and brutally written off by political analysts and mainstream media. this is what electoral politics is all about. in 2014 general elections, no one predicted such landslide victory of the modi-led bjp party, it still happened. for the upcoming 2019 lok sabha polls, experts can only predict either a majority for the national democratic alliance (nda) or a fractured mandate with no clear majority to any party. indeed, the indian national congress, in view of most political analysts, stands no chance to come up with maximum number of seats in the parliament. of course, the bjp has delivered on some aspects. free lpg connections

read more the ‘underdog theory’ for 2019 lok sabha elections

why we need more jio-styled cos, and psu need to cut costs

the world is becoming ultra-competitive, all thanks to greater than ever dissemination of information through electronic means. today, no company (except those with cutting-edge tech like google and microsoft) operating in a specific industry can expect to be the sole beneficiary of demand for a particular product/ service. margins are getting thinner and this is all a good sign, we will tell you why. for a country like ours, all problems lie in income disparity that has only exacerbated despite of political promises to curb it. with those who earn handsome money and are willing and actually spending large sums on imported goods like electronics and garments, our trade balance has suffered. this ‘handsome money’ that they make can be attributed to the irrationality of their employers. companies, both private and public, have not prudently considered changing market conditions and are thus unable to rein in rising operating expenses, especially those incurred on salaries. take airtel for example. post jio’s

read more why we need more jio-styled cos, and psu need to cut costs

why we must act fast on cannabis and amend the ndps act

medicinal benefits of cannabis are still unknown to the wider audience. however, in recent past, countries in the west, including usa and uk, have liberalized their stance on cannabis in the backdrop of emerging knowledge on extraordinary health benefits that cannabis is capable to deliver. medical conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, side-effects from cancer treatment and muscle spasticity reportedly find cure in cannabis. the cannabidiol (cbd) contained in cannabis has exceptional medicinal uses and a drug named ‘epidiolex’ (for treatment of childhood epilepsy) containing cbd has recently been approved in the united states. it is notable that cbd is a molecule found in marijuana plant and it has just 0.1 percent of tetrahydrocannabinol (thc), an ingredient that is responsible for making people high once consumed. many drugs available in the market as cure for above cited medical conditions are either expensive or haven’t been efficacious enough. in india, prescribing cannabis-based drugs is illegal and research and development in this

read more why we must act fast on cannabis and amend the ndps act

sbi, other psb have only abused their hegemonic position

the 2 percent wage hike proposed by indian banks’ association to psb employees is unacceptable to them, and they have their own set of reasons. just one question- are present pay structures of psb employees commensurate with their skills and duties they perform? when one compares the monthly pay of an sbi staffer with that of a private sector staffer with identical skillsets, say with an accountant at a private enterprise, the picture that bank staffers are already drawing exceedingly high salaries becomes clear. for decades, public sector banks misused and severely abused their dominant positions, which is owing to the general public viewing these banks as quasi-government, not just government-run banks. people feel safe when their savings lie with public sector banks and this compulsion of people to use the services of psb has been exploited to the core. sbi, for example, not only pays lucrative and unreasonable salaries to probationary officers and other staffers, but also takes care

read more sbi, other psb have only abused their hegemonic position

what future holds for flipkart

borrowing an idea from overseas and implementing it in one’s own country is the new success mantra for present-age entrepreneurs. had replicating a successful business model in another country been such easy and rewarding a task, the disparities between developed and underdeveloped nations would have gradually come to an end. it is obvious that uber, the ride-hailing company, would have employed many market experts while deciding on foraying into other territories beyond us and europe. the outcome, however, is an evidence that their analysis was greatly misplaced with respect to gauging opportunities. uber has called it a day in many asian countries; in india, it is competing with ola and on the back of its deep pockets is making good inroads, but profit is still elusive. most indian startups fail to take note of a simple fact that the market here is incomparable to that in developed countries. you may be able to acquire customers by offering lucrative discounts and

read more what future holds for flipkart

why corporates need to rationalise costs

economies across the world have slowed down, those posting good numbers of gdp growth rate aren’t faring well on equitable distribution of national income. then is the issue of rising number of loan defaulters. so what happened suddenly in the economic landscape that well-established companies, barring a few, are increasingly falling in the trap of squeezed profits? first globalisation (that in the indian scene resulted in public sector undertakings sharing their market base with more competitive enterprises, causing gradual decline in performances of psu firms) and now easy access to information (all thanks to the internet revolution) that is not allowing companies to reap unfair profits owing to new ventures in related business coming up rapidly through easily gained knowledge of a profitable market. google is perhaps the best company to work with as per studies, the internet giant has great workplaces, jaw-dropping salary packages for staffers and the perfect work-life balance. but google can afford this, at least for

read more why corporates need to rationalise costs

time is now for banking sector reforms

the bjp is in power in most indian states and its feat in the north-east is an evidence that voters are decisively backing the pro-development and reformist stance of the prime minister. so the perfect time to bring long-pending reforms in banking is now. when indira gandhi brought bank nationalisation in 1969, the move that was although opposed by many in her own party, went down well with the general populace, only because people viewed it as furthering their interests. even at that time, nationalising banks wasn’t the most preferred action to bring a change in how banks functioned; it was thought that banks were operating as agents of few corporates, while the needs of underprivileged classes were not being paid heed to. the then Indira-led government, prior to bringing the nationalisation ordinance, brought the scheme of social control over banks (which couldn’t last long), where a national credit council was established with finance minister as head and representatives of

read more time is now for banking sector reforms